Note on Sanskrit transcription and choice of script

I am perfectly aware that Devanāgarī has become the most widely spread script for writing Sanskrit online. The standardisation of its use had started during the colonial time, when big areas of South Asia were under the British Raj and apparently, this script which was also used for Nepali and Hindi, was more convenient when … Continue reading Note on Sanskrit transcription and choice of script

Śaṅkhācārya’s name and story

Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra One of the previous lives of the Buddha शाक्यमुनि Śākyamuni, was a life of a ऋषि ṛṣi – a wise man – according to the Treatise of the great virtue of wisdom, the महाप्रज्ञापारमिताशास्त्र Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra written by Nāgārjuna, a famous Mahāyāna author and – theologian if I could say – at least thinker. The … Continue reading Śaṅkhācārya’s name and story

Dionysus at the heart of Mahayana’s cultural cradle – A reaction to: S. Peterson’s ‘An account of the Dionysiac presence in Indian art and culture’

From the History of Art and Archaeology Department of University of London, Sara Peterson proposes an analysis on shapes – in three dimensions – that bear witness of a Hellenic presence in ancient India, especially in Bactria and around the Kingdom of Gandhāra, in the beginning of the times when the Buddhic message was starting … Continue reading Dionysus at the heart of Mahayana’s cultural cradle – A reaction to: S. Peterson’s ‘An account of the Dionysiac presence in Indian art and culture’

Daai-Hak-Tin [大黑天] : The Spirit behind the Dark Gods of Hong Kong Streets

Around ten years ago, in a time when I was lost between different parishes, between good and evil, between the spirit and the matter, between Jesus and Shiva, and between Cronus and Dionysus, my godson and son of my sister, genuinely asked me that simple but hardly answerable question: “c’est quoi, ta religion?” or, if … Continue reading Daai-Hak-Tin [大黑天] : The Spirit behind the Dark Gods of Hong Kong Streets