All Saints Day, Chung Yeung, Ghosts and Gods

Because the celebration of 重陽節 Chung Yeung [1] usually happens in fall, around September or October, and because it bears so much connections with the questions human beings ask themselves about death, I can never avoid each year, to compare it with European fall festivals that celebrate the dead. In Southern and Western European countries, … Continue reading All Saints Day, Chung Yeung, Ghosts and Gods

Les mots sont sordides

Les mots sont sordideset les concepts videset les concepts creuxComme un nuagetu dansessur ce que tu crois diresur ce que tu crois faireet que tu penses écrireComme un nuagetu pensespouvoir dominer l’idéevouloir exprimer la vieet que tu crois menercomme un homme sageLes hommesaujourd’hui sont des chiensaujourd’hui sont sans corpsseulement leurs bouches vomissentComme un carnagetu crainsle … Continue reading Les mots sont sordides

The real original lyrics of ‘Do you hear the people sing?’

The real original lyrics of ‘À la volonté du peuple’ (known in English as ‘Do you hear the people sing?’) are from Alain Boublil who composed the song with Claude-Michel Schönberg for the musical adaptation in 1980 of Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables. Many new adaptations have been made since the 80’s until recently, when the … Continue reading The real original lyrics of ‘Do you hear the people sing?’

Past Participle Agreement in French: Aristocracy of Complexity

Almost every year, we hear or read the same question among French speakers: should we keep that complex grammar rule about past participle agreement when used with a passé composé [1]? This rule is not an original Old nor Middle French inspiration. It has been implemented into French around the end of Renaissance. Before the … Continue reading Past Participle Agreement in French: Aristocracy of Complexity