Lecturing people on classical languages pronunciation [Response]

Recently, I have read concerns about the fact that many scholars in Western Europe and in the Americas, use an ‘Erasmian’ style of pronunciation when reading Classical Greek texts. There is apparently an identitarian trend of calling out people who are not native to Modern Greece, to ‘mispronounce’ classical texts, as if the Modern Greek … Continue reading Lecturing people on classical languages pronunciation [Response]

Concerns about a word in the year of the 牛 ox

It is not possible for me to avoid the topic on the first day of the year which will be dominated by a metal ox: the name of this animal in Chinese and in other languages. When you check on articles that provide information on the Chinese lunar calendar and its so-called ‘zodiac signs’, you … Continue reading Concerns about a word in the year of the 牛 ox

Where does January come from?

NOTE: The following post is not an opinion but a didactic post for students, previously published on Lamptēr Glossōn and republished here. Numa PompiliusCour CarréeLe Louvre, Paris It is the first month of the year in the Gregorian calendar but it has not always been this way. The month of January was added to the Roman calendar … Continue reading Where does January come from?

Śaṅkhācārya’s name and story

Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra One of the previous lives of the Buddha शाक्यमुनि Śākyamuni, was a life of a ऋषि ṛṣi – a wise man – according to the Treatise of the great virtue of wisdom, the महाप्रज्ञापारमिताशास्त्र Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra written by Nāgārjuna, a famous Mahāyāna author and – theologian if I could say – at least thinker. The … Continue reading Śaṅkhācārya’s name and story

Christmas · Saturnalia · Noël · Navidad

NOTE: The following post is not an opinion but a didactic post for students, previously published on Lamptēr Glossōn and republished here. Malls and public places are covered with garlands and decorated trees. Maybe at home, in your own place, your living-room has been prepared now for the celebrations of December. And apart from the … Continue reading Christmas · Saturnalia · Noël · Navidad

All Saints Day, Chung Yeung, Ghosts and Gods

Because the celebration of 重陽節 Chung Yeung [1] usually happens in fall, around September or October, and because it bears so much connections with the questions human beings ask themselves about death, I can never avoid each year, to compare it with European fall festivals that celebrate the dead. In Southern and Western European countries, … Continue reading All Saints Day, Chung Yeung, Ghosts and Gods

Mughal-e-Azam

Released in 1960 and directed by K. Asif, the Indian movie called Mughal-e-Azam, is a tale made after the scenario created by Imtiaz Ali Taj about the legend of Anarkali. Dreamy version of India’s Moghul Empire’s history, Anarkali could have been a court dancer which Prince Salim, son of the famous Emperor Akbar, was supposed … Continue reading Mughal-e-Azam

Chytroi

Fields of bones along his wayyour clinking skeletons arrayto follow the red man that you pray Seeds that died for long and greyand that he had shed on Thursdaylike a cyan lightening digging the clay form the new soldiers who’ll stayto help their fuzzy lord and preyall the men who avoided to gray Blood of … Continue reading Chytroi

Dionysus at the heart of Mahayana’s cultural cradle – A reaction to: S. Peterson’s ‘An account of the Dionysiac presence in Indian art and culture’

From the History of Art and Archaeology Department of University of London, Sara Peterson proposes an analysis on shapes – in three dimensions – that bear witness of a Hellenic presence in ancient India, especially in Bactria and around the Kingdom of Gandhāra, in the beginning of the times when the Buddhic message was starting … Continue reading Dionysus at the heart of Mahayana’s cultural cradle – A reaction to: S. Peterson’s ‘An account of the Dionysiac presence in Indian art and culture’

Ancient Chinese same-sex unions

It was during one of our stays in Taiwan that we learnt about the existence of a Chinese equivalent of the adelphopoiesis for male partners in China, during the 明 Ming dynasty, quite similar to the Southern French Occitan affrèrement or like the actual religious Byzantine αδελφοποίησις – under supervision of the Greek Church – … Continue reading Ancient Chinese same-sex unions