Shakuntalā – 2nd Day of Lenaia 2021

Since the Mahābhārata epic, Shakuntalā is famous as the girl who married king Dushyanta. In Kālidāsa’s work, she is an abandoned girl who encounters the king during his hunt. After they marry, king Dushyanta gives Shakuntalā a ring as a proof of their wedding when she will join him in the capital. Unfortunately, a curse … Continue reading Shakuntalā – 2nd Day of Lenaia 2021

Two cases of writing innovation : in Gaul and in Bactria

The following are two examples of how what we call 「Greek alphabet」 has been a more complex system of written communication in different parts of the world, for languages which were not Greek, and in societies which were not originally Hellenic. A script is not necessarily connected with only one language and the alphabet was … Continue reading Two cases of writing innovation : in Gaul and in Bactria

Mughal-e-Azam

Released in 1960 and directed by K. Asif, the Indian movie called Mughal-e-Azam, is a tale made after the scenario created by Imtiaz Ali Taj about the legend of Anarkali. Dreamy version of India’s Moghul Empire’s history, Anarkali could have been a court dancer which Prince Salim, son of the famous Emperor Akbar, was supposed … Continue reading Mughal-e-Azam

Dionysus at the heart of Mahayana’s cultural cradle – A reaction to: S. Peterson’s ‘An account of the Dionysiac presence in Indian art and culture’

From the History of Art and Archaeology Department of University of London, Sara Peterson proposes an analysis on shapes – in three dimensions – that bear witness of a Hellenic presence in ancient India, especially in Bactria and around the Kingdom of Gandhāra, in the beginning of the times when the Buddhic message was starting … Continue reading Dionysus at the heart of Mahayana’s cultural cradle – A reaction to: S. Peterson’s ‘An account of the Dionysiac presence in Indian art and culture’