Note on Sanskrit transcription and choice of script

I am perfectly aware that Devanāgarī has become the most widely spread script for writing Sanskrit online. The standardisation of its use had started during the colonial time, when big areas of South Asia were under the British Raj and apparently, this script which was also used for Nepali and Hindi, was more convenient when … Continue reading Note on Sanskrit transcription and choice of script

Concerns about a word in the year of the 牛 ox

It is not possible for me to avoid the topic on the first day of the year which will be dominated by a metal ox: the name of this animal in Chinese and in other languages. When you check on articles that provide information on the Chinese lunar calendar and its so-called ‘zodiac signs’, you … Continue reading Concerns about a word in the year of the 牛 ox

Where does January come from?

NOTE: The following post is not an opinion but a didactic post for students, previously published on Lamptēr Glossōn and republished here. Numa PompiliusCour CarréeLe Louvre, Paris It is the first month of the year in the Gregorian calendar but it has not always been this way. The month of January was added to the Roman calendar … Continue reading Where does January come from?

Christmas · Saturnalia · Noël · Navidad

NOTE: The following post is not an opinion but a didactic post for students, previously published on Lamptēr Glossōn and republished here. Malls and public places are covered with garlands and decorated trees. Maybe at home, in your own place, your living-room has been prepared now for the celebrations of December. And apart from the … Continue reading Christmas · Saturnalia · Noël · Navidad

All Saints Day, Chung Yeung, Ghosts and Gods

Because the celebration of 重陽節 Chung Yeung [1] usually happens in fall, around September or October, and because it bears so much connections with the questions human beings ask themselves about death, I can never avoid each year, to compare it with European fall festivals that celebrate the dead. In Southern and Western European countries, … Continue reading All Saints Day, Chung Yeung, Ghosts and Gods

Two cases of writing innovation : in Gaul and in Bactria

The following are two examples of how what we call 「Greek alphabet」 has been a more complex system of written communication in different parts of the world, for languages which were not Greek, and in societies which were not originally Hellenic. A script is not necessarily connected with only one language and the alphabet was … Continue reading Two cases of writing innovation : in Gaul and in Bactria

Les mots sont sordides

Les mots sont sordideset les concepts videset les concepts creuxComme un nuagetu dansessur ce que tu crois diresur ce que tu crois faireet que tu penses écrireComme un nuagetu pensespouvoir dominer l’idéevouloir exprimer la vieet que tu crois menercomme un homme sageLes hommesaujourd’hui sont des chiensaujourd’hui sont sans corpsseulement leurs bouches vomissentComme un carnagetu crainsle … Continue reading Les mots sont sordides

Past Participle Agreement in French: Aristocracy of Complexity

Almost every year, we hear or read the same question among French speakers: should we keep that complex grammar rule about past participle agreement when used with a passé composé [1]? This rule is not an original Old nor Middle French inspiration. It has been implemented into French around the end of Renaissance. Before the … Continue reading Past Participle Agreement in French: Aristocracy of Complexity